Review: Young Guns – Bones

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4
On 4 February 2012
Last modified:13 November 2017

Summary:

Young Guns have come a long way since the release of their debut EP Mirrors in 2009. When the band self-released their debut album in 2010 it was critically acclaimed and not only gained them a decent fanbase but also support slots for Lostprophets, Funeral For A Friend and The All Time Low.

In 2011 Young Guns were signed to PIAS which would mark the next huge step for the band. By the time Learn My Lesson was released in October it was clear that the band would attract a whole new crowd of fans who had fairly heard of the band before – myself included. Learn My Lesson left such an impact on me that I’ve been craving for the album release ever since and here it is at last.

The album kicks off with the same energy that blew me away when I first listened to Learn My Lesson. I was born, I have lived, I will surely Die is the smashing opening line of same-titled song. “Every day is a chance to change the story” Wood sings in the chorus. The opener makes it quite clear that the band has written and recorded this record while touring the world from Thailand to Spain and back to their hometown High Wycombe.

Young Guns have matured in many ways and it shines all the way through the record. Dearly Departed continues with the same energy and leads straight to the title track Bones which will prove to be the perfect sing-along for their tour which has just started. Young Guns aim high and Bones was certainly written for arenas rather than clubs.

Hymn For All I’ve Lost is an acoustic ballad and is perfectly placed in the middle of the album. I only wonder why it’s just over one minute long thus being the shortest track on the album.

After another slow number (You Are Not) the album launches back into pounding drums and fast guitars. Brother In Arms and Learn My Lesson are certainly two of the record’s highlights.

Everything Ends once more shows a pensive side of Young Guns followed by Interlude which seems to be a little redundant now that there’s only two songs left but I never really understood interludes anyhow so maybe it’s just me.

The final track Broadfields is probably the most sophisticated song on the album. It’s an anthemic ballad building up to a crescendo. The only negative thing I can say about this record is that occasionally Gustav Wood’s voice is drowned in the music (Your Are Not, Broadfields) which seems unnecessary given his vocal range.

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